TShirtSlayer Heavy Metal Merch Gallery
  • Bands (0)
  • Groups (0)
  • Members (0)
  • (X)

World's largest community of heavy metal tshirt and battlejacket collectors.

Status message

You must be a member to comment, so join!

Collectors Group : "German-Style" - Kutten

This group accepts: 
  • Battle Jacket
Created: 10 August 2020
Linked Posts: 100

Collectors group: "German-Style" - Kutten

Shapes, Overlapping and no more denim! Only Kutten / Vests / Battle-jackets completely covered in Patches! This group is for all the maniacs that wanna sew this style or already have "finished" their project... Which is a lie! Get inspired!

In this group...

  • dce385b4d5c913df50e1480dc6ba149a.jpg
Altair's picture

Heyo, you can update my battlevest, I've exchanged the backpatch and added more patches on it ;)

Heavy Metal Marc's picture

These are so awesome! I haven't tried to do this, kinda slowly getting more into jackets like this since I'd normally go with a more classic Americano Thrash look. I'm just trying to figure out how to even get started with something like this.

kingdomofhannover's picture

If you need any advice feel free to ask mate!

Alter dicker Mann's picture

Da haste aber nen Uraltfoto von meinem Lappen hervorgewühlt :D

Alter dicker Mann's picture

Jetzt hab ick mal jeguckt.....das is ja tatsächlich die aktuellste front in meinem Profil.....ich bin echt zu selten hier :D

AmonVD's picture

Soy nuevo y me gustaría aprender o conocer más sobre el NSBM alguien con quien pueda compartir al respecto?
Bandas, temas sobre illuminaties, Nazismo, The Black Sun.

SilverAngel's picture

Mine*

SilverAngel's picture

Will update me me soon will post a picture with possible patches in a few minutes

Hliðskialf's picture

General question: Do you limit yourself to one patch per band in order to put as many different favourite bands on your kutte as possible or do you put multiple patches from one band on there?

I used to do the former but I'm currently contemplating adding multiple patches for bands that are 1) among my all-time favourite bands and 2) to reflect drastic changes in their playstyle - for example putting both Scream Bloody Gore and Symbolic on there.

Sarosxx's picture

I have to limit my self in some way because there is not enough space left to add several patches of one interpret l

Rotten's picture

I did for mine. Just one patch per band

Kofuv6's picture

I want to do 1 per band but backpatches are an exception. Stripes might be an exception as well but I'm still thinking about that

But damn it's so hard to choose when you have 2 killer patches of the same band and you can't decide which one that's going on the vest and not

kingdomofhannover's picture

Dismemberrrrrrrrrr!!!;)

Kofuv6's picture

Ofc ;)

Hliðskialf's picture

I know that feel. There is a shaped And Justice for All... patch on my kutte while I have burgundy border Creeping Death and burgundy border Master of Puppets lying around.

fauzan big's picture

Good question.
Actually, i limit the patches to one band two patches (regular patch and logo / cut out patch). I just want more bands variety in my vest

kingdomofhannover's picture

It quickly became clear to me that with the large number of shapes and patches I couldn't get past having bands twice or sometimes even three times because I don't even know so many bands that I like enough to have them on my vest. For me this is of course also due to the fact that it is a pure Death Metal vest with very few exceptions ...

Hliðskialf's picture

That's quite the compliment coming from the man himself.
Do you intend to build your kutte like that as well?

kingdomofhannover's picture

Hey hey! The Doc himself, that is cool! Where is your vest mate? Any questions about it? ;)

kingdomofhannover's picture

Guys, you never stop learning and I'm really curious. What do you value in the layout? How are your steps while working?What do you pay particular attention to? Let's exchange ideas if you like to. Whe‘re all not done yet :)

Hliðskialf's picture

Good idea for a discussion.
I strive for what is called "sprezzatura" in Renaissance Italy - studied carelessness. The layout has to look chaotic and asymmetrical while hours upon hours of careful planning where spent to ensure it looks like that. That's especially true with overlapping patches. I always make sure that a) the band logo and b) the recognizable part of the artwork is never covered by the overlapping patch.
It's also important to have the right amount of each type of patch - square album artworks, logo shapes, odd shapes (triangle, circle, coffin, etc.) and superstrips. The same holds true for embroidered and woven patches, though I usually prefer my logos to be embroidered while the artwork patches are woven (there are some exceptions, e.g. Armoured Angel - Mysterium shape).
I start off with the placement of the backpatch. This may sound trivial but depending on whether I want to use a backshape or not the horizontal placement may vary. That's important as the first part I plan afterwards is the collar and the transition between backpatch and sleeves - the bottleneck sections if you will. Afterwards I work my way down until the back is complete. Due to the way my overlapping works (if I want to remove 1 specific patch I may have to unsew up to 4 other patches first) I do the middle of the sides next so that I can get a smooth transition to the back. With my first kutten layouts I left that part until the end and it showed as I had 1) less patches to work with and 2) less space for aesthetically pleasing arrangements. Also, nowadays I try to preserve at least one breast pocket to store change, lighters or dextrose.

kingdomofhannover's picture

Thanks for your detailed description. For me, most of the points are very similar. The basic requirement for me is that I have the entire basic layout ready before I start sewing. For me, this definitely includes the fact that denim is no longer visible and that there are already liquid transitions between the patches. In this case, it doesn't matter whether I start at the back or at front. I photograph every detail several times and can later on lay out everything as I need it to sew. The most difficult part are the shoulder area and the sides. Looking at my vest after the first upload you didn't see any blue denim, but due to the many dark patches there were a lot of contiguous black areas and too many let’s call it "hard borders" due to edges, borders or colored backgrounds. To this day I am in the process of defusing this to me exclusion criteria by using many shapes so that everything merges even more smoothly. Actually really a life's work. Sometimes you rack your brain for weeks over spots of a few centimeters in size ... let's call it a little crazy ...

Kofuv6's picture

Question regarding layout, how do you make your own shaped paches, do you simply use a sissor/knife or is there any other way to shape a patch?

kingdomofhannover's picture

If you use scissors, they must be very sharp and small. I take one that is on a swiss pocket knife. You have to cut very carefully and precisely with woven patches and then scorch the edges with a lighter because otherwise the cut out part will certainly fray and be destroyed very quickly. You need to have good timing because you only have to heat the outer edge for a very short time. Otherwise half the patch will burn or melt away. But you can also use a soldering iron and move it along the motif that you want to cut out. It automatically scorches the edges. With the soldering iron, however, there is a very hard, somewhat bulky edge. I think it's the cleanest way to do it is with a normal needle that you put into a cork and then you bring the tip to glow over a burning candle. Works like a soldering iron but the edge becomes finer and gaps can also be worked out more precisely.

Kofuv6's picture

Thank you for this info :D

will save and screenshot this as well so i won't forget it

kingdomofhannover's picture

You‘re welcome mate!:)

Kofuv6's picture

another one then

Why do Germans use the word Kutte when talking about vests?

Hliðskialf's picture

The term dates back to the German word for a monk's cowl (Mönchskutte).
Maybe the term is used because both the monk's cowl and the metal kutte are visual representations of one's choice of life and the consequences accrueing from it.

/edit: From Middle High German kutte (“monk habit”), from Medieval Latin cotta (“undercoat, tunic”), from Proto-Germanic *kuttô (“cowl, woolen cloth, coat”).

Kofuv6's picture

So thats why, thank you for your answer and thank you for everything tonight, i have learned a lot and enjoyed this a lot as well :)

Hliðskialf's picture

Me too, my friend. I'm really looking forward to seeing your kutte in the future ;)

Kofuv6's picture

me too, hopefully it will be done by the end of this year but we'll see :P

Hliðskialf's picture

Is it gonna be the Indescent and Obscene backpatch? Cause that one allows for some nice overlapping... ;)

Kofuv6's picture

Indeed, was gonna use Nespithe bp made by ptpp as the bp but when i saw the Indecent bp I fell in love and told myself, i need this to my vest, took a while to find it but I did so im super happy

yes it allows me to be more creative which im looking forward to, gonna be a pain in the ass but it's gonna be worth it...hopefully....

Hliðskialf's picture

I'm sure it will. Also, if we're being honest, we all want to have a vest that's as unique as possible so the best bet is using a backpatch that's 1) somewhat rare and 2) seldom used on an actual vest. Indescent and Obscene fits both of these criteria.

kingdomofhannover's picture

Good question:) Well the German word for a vest which has some patches on it is Kutte. Everywhere, Bikers, Punks, Metalheads... It‘s how we call it. At this point I am wondering why this word is used in lot’s of other languages to..:)

Kofuv6's picture

Gotcha, intreasting that its used in other areas as well besides metal vest, thanks for the answer and for everything tonight, learned a lot :)

Hliðskialf's picture

I take a sewing needle and jam it into a piece of cork (if you fancy wine or know someone who does, you'll have a near limitless supply). Now you grab the cork, which acts as an insulator, as if you were holding a pencil and heat the tip of the needle in the flame of a candle until the tip turns bright red. Now you can cut through 1-2 cm of patch fabric as if it were butter. After you have shaped the aforementioned length, reheat the needle and repeat the process. Note that shaping embroidered patches takes longer as you will only be able to shape a couple milimeters before you need to reheat.
I suggest practing on cheap patches first as it is kinda hard to shape straight lines at first. There will be no fraying of the edges as the needle has successfully cauterized them.
One thing that I cannot stress enough is that you should do this outside/with open windows as there will be toxic fumes that you do not wish to breathe in.

Kofuv6's picture

Thank you so much for the reply, this will help me A LOT in the future

Have taken a screenshot of this and put it into the Discord server that I and my friends has because this is something I cannot afford to forget and they might use this info as well in the future :D

Hliðskialf's picture

I used to plan everything in advance as well but nowadays I only plan 3 or 4 patches ahead. This allows me to fix the patches in place with pins and look at the layout from all possible angles. If I did that with a larger amount of patches at once, the pins would bend as it's not uncommon for me to have three patches overlapping in the same spot with seams underneath.
As I've redone my vest so many times, I have developed a pretty good understanding about its dimensions and the number of patches I can fit in a certain area so this is really all about aesthetics.

Also, I know your struggle but I think there needs to be some kind of balance between smooth transitions via shaped patches and hard transitions between square/rectangular patches. The latter work best with differently coloured borders involved.

kingdomofhannover's picture

Ok! You can see the different approaches very nicely :) For example, I don't like the thing with differently colored edges or borders that meet. If it cannot be avoided, I would do everything to defuse this point.

But talking about that is cool! This is exactly what this group should be for somehow! That's really interesting!

Hliðskialf's picture

I think with some of the more exotic border colours (Ghost's Opus Eponymous in turquoise, Cemetary's An Evil Shade of Grey in racing green, Witching Hour's Past Midnight in lime, Division Speed in mailbox yellow) it helps create a more vibrant colour dynamic which is very important for me. There's just too many black and white or black/red/white vests out there. I want mine to stand out like a peacock.

Yeah, this kind of exchange is what I was hoping for. There still much to learn and to master on the quest for the perfect kutte :)

Unjustifiablexistence's picture

I'm completely with you here. I don't like"normal" black borders showing and having their straight lines, but somehow I'm okay with colored borders popping out!
I think they really add character and make a vest more vibrant. But in my opinion some part of the border should always be covered even if colored, at least if it's a square patch!

Kofuv6's picture

Im also trying to make my vest as colourful as possible, and yes there's to many black/white/red patches out there

and trust me, you and kingdomofhannover have mastered the ways of the Kutte, what does Kutte even mean if i may ask?

kingdomofhannover's picture

Omg... I would never ever have the patience to rebuild my complete vest after so many hours of sewing ...

Kofuv6's picture

Neither would I if I had 100+ patches on my vest

Hliðskialf's picture

Yeah, it's a full blown cycle (whether you call it a vicious circle or a benign circle is up to you):
1) "Hell yeah, I've crafted perfection. I'm never gonna change a damn thing about my kutte ever again."
2) "Those are some nice German style vests being posted on TSS. Maybe I can take some inspiration from them."
3) "I guess I could change some patches here and there. Also, there'll be some changes in bands to reflect my changing musical taste."
4) "Fuck it, gonna take that whole thing down and start anew. If you wish to create, you first need to destroy."

On a side note, the first time I completely redid my 90+ patches vest, my wife looked at me in utter disbelief and tried to discourage me. Nowadays, she's more like "please try to avoid doing a complete overhaul of your kutte more than twice a year"

;)

Kofuv6's picture

Im definitly guilty of point nr 2 to my new pösör vest as I call it and point nr 3 of my festival vest

Twice per year, man you got some spare time in your life don't ya ;)

Hliðskialf's picture

Got a couple hours to burn before I go to sleep every night and those add up. Also, sewing and planning won't take as long with each consecutive redo. I think my last iteration took a little more than a month to complete.

Hliðskialf's picture

Practice makes perfect but obsession makes better ;)

Hliðskialf's picture

The description is spot on, expecially the last part.
Can't wait to redo mine again once I got all the necessary new patches :)

Pages